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20121101
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the road, tim edmonds is building a whole new community for people like margot brown. soon his efforts will transform this farmland into corporate office parks, a golf course and 4,600 new homes. this is, indeed, an edge city. as you look at suburbanization of america and following transportation corridors, both north and south-- whatever the geographic area happens to be-- it is, uh, an example of that. people here are commuting within the 25-to-30-mile radius. um, u're not going to see too much migration into the city, but they are currently working with about a 25-mile radii, and they're looking for value and looking for, uh, lifestyle. the development is really creating a whole, new town. uh, we will have up to 5,000 residential units, roughly 400 acres of commercial office areas. we have various retail components, golf courses, school sites. so you're going to see all the elements that you would see in most hometowns. uh, they will all be in one development. narrator: one development-- building over 2,600 acres of prime farmland. pihl: sobo is fe xioumo buyangrth is put pssureo. ,
drms and efforts are reaching a successf conusion. "femme" is at home. brown: "it's everything we hoped." today, suspended 42 feet above the museum floor, "femme" is fulfilling her intended role. she stands tall, as the 76-foot mobile by miro's close friend alexander calder slowly circles by. she is in the company of the works of other modern masters such as henry moore and jean arp, of david smith, noguchi, caro, rosati and motherwell. but she stands alone at the head of the south wall as a unifying force and vital core of color in the east building of the national gallery of art. ( music ) ( music ) narrator: thomas moran embarked on his first trip to the west in 1871. the united states at the time was still recovering from the ravages of the civil war. americans turned with hope to the western frontier. by painting the pristine grandeur of these remote places, moran enabled 19th-century americans to visualize a magnificent landscape most would never see. his paintings transformed their perceptions of the west. from 1867 to 1879, the united states government sponsored four western exp
paficot is much like north america's, the abut in reverse. here, it's the north that is mostly dry and brown, is mbut as you movsouthica's, thtoigr latitus,rse. the green color of this thatsatellite photomosaicown, reveals an ecological zone with great potential for market-motivated exports. along chile's coast, south of santiago, are the small mountains know the coastalange. this region is the center of chile's booming forest products sector. the st common treeere now is the radiata, or monterey pine, imported from california 30 years ago. unr the right condions, radia pines the fastt growg trs the world, because unlike other trees, they continue to grow all year round. they like it damp, and they won't grow where it is too hot or too cold. that leaves out most places. but with much ideal habitat, chile's south-central coast is now world's by 2000, chile harvested moreha mlion cuc mersf afor cn for wood pulp to mceulose. japa. ddespite japan's economic stagnation, and the asian crisis of the late '90s. fish, too, are an important primary product. whether netted in the pacific or raised on
that is mostly dry and brown, but as you move south to higher latitudes, the green color of this satellite photomosaic reveals an ecological zone with great potential for market-motivated exports. along chile's coast, south of santiago, are the small mountains knowas the coastalange. this region is the center of chile's booming forest products sector. the imported from california the radia30 years ago.ey pine, under the right condns, radiata pines the fastt growg trs he world, because unlike other trees, they continue to grow all year round. they like it damp, and they won't grow where it is too hot or too cold. that leaves out most places. but with much ideal habitat, chile's south-central coast is now world's by 2000, chile harvested moreha million for wood pulp to mceulose.tpan . demand continues in the 21st century, despite japan's economic stagnation and the asian crisis of the late '90s. fish, too, are an important primary product. whether netted in the pacific or raised on commercial farms, th u. anasian consumers. sh and lumber could come from many places around thelobe and they ca
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4